Collection: Fresh Elderberry Cuttings

Spacing - 2' to 4’ apart in rows. Rows 12' to 16’ apart. They can be added as features in your landscape as well, lots of fun!

Elderberries are dioecious, both male and female at the same time, and maybe semi-self fertile but it is best to plant at least two for cross-pollination and the heaviest crops.

Adams - This sweet varietal ripens early and is one of the tallest. As one of the oldest varietals hailing from New York, these tall plants produce luscious clusters of berries, dark in color and high-yielding. Indeterminate

Bob Gordon - This new and unique varietal has inverted berry heads that help to protect them from avian threats. The yield of the Bob Gordon has proven to be close to triple that of other varieties! Research has indicated that this is a superior elderberry variety, especially for the Midwest regions. Determinate.

Pocahontas - Fast-growing and high yielding, this elderberry varietal packs a punch! Flower cymes and berry heads are larger than others, up to 24” across. Shorter growing seasons may result in berries that don’t fully ripen, as blooms occur later than other varieties. Indeterminate

Ranch - Harsh conditions and poorer soil are no problem for this aptly named varietal. The shorter, stocky shape offers a lower fruiting canopy and berries are produced on single stems. Earliest Determinate. Good for the heat.

York - This varietal is tolerant of both dry and moist soil conditions and are hearty fruiting shrubs when established. They can even tolerate partial shade! This later-ripening varietal requires consistent watering in the hottest months and will yield large, dark, soft, and plentiful purple berries.  

Wyldewood - With a potential of 12,000 lbs. per acre, this variety is an enthusiastic producer! Most stems occur with three umbels that are first to reach bud break of the majority of varieties, and ripen later in the season. Wyldewood is the first varietal to be released by the University of Missouri. Indeterminate. Slow establisher.

 

Any questions please reach out out to hello@central.farm